Sophisticated health care purchasers and health plans know the value of prescription drug data. When analyzed with paid claims data from physicians and hospitals, data from pharmacy claims can be used to identify, understand, and track a wide range of issues.

Starting January 2006, when the 6.5 million dual eligibles move from Medicaid to Medicare for their prescription drug benefits, state Medicaid agencies will no longer have access to data on drug use by these extremely expensive, at-risk beneficiaries – patients who drive over 40 percent of Medicaid costs. As a result, Medicaid managers will lose an invaluable source of information, severely handicapping the ability of states to monitor quality, access, and costs and catch waste, fraud, and abuse.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) lacks the legal authority to require Medicare prescription drug plans (PDPs and MA-PDs) share data with Medicaid. However, nothing precludes voluntary Rx data sharing between Medicare drug plans and states.

Voluntary data sharing would be an easy, inexpensive way for Medicare drug plans to gain goodwill among states and advocates, generate positive publicity, and differentiate themselves from the mass of competitor plans. In addition, because dual eligibles may switch plans any time and multiple times each year, two-way data exchanges with states would aide drug therapy transitions, utilization review, and medication therapy management. Stand-alone PDPs, which are at risk only for drug costs and therefore will not have access to any non-drug data, could greatly benefit from data from state Medicaid programs (e.g., diagnoses, prescription history, providers seen)

To help make this happen:

– A major pharmaceutical manufacturer should offer to fund a national initiative to show the business and clinical case for information exchange, develop data sharing agreements, iron out any technical obstacles (e.g., data safeguards), and cover the modest start-up costs (e.g., systems changes). In addition to generating goodwill, this would help minimize disruption in drug therapy, quality problems, and errors – and reduce lost revenue and bad publicity that will inevitably result if duals have problems accessing vital medications.

– In their standards for a Medicare drug plan to be designated as a preferred plan for low-income beneficiaries, State Pharmaceutical Assistance Programs (SPAPs) should require that preferred drug plans to exchange duals’ Rx data with states.