Since Medicaid is administered by the states, traditionally virtually all Medicaid anti-fraud efforts were managed by state Medicaid agencies, with civil enforcement and payment recoveries by the Medicaid agency and criminal prosecutions by the state attorney general and the AG’s Medicaid fraud control unit (MFCU). States vary widely in their approaches, the relative sophistication of tools used, and staff resources dedicated. For example, Northern and Western states tend to focus on provider fraud and Southern states tend to focus more on beneficiary fraud.

The recently enacted Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA) significantly expands the federal government’s role in combating Medicaid fraud and abuse. The new provisions have far-reaching implications for states, providers, and health plans as well as for the federal-state relationship. If managed well and in close coordination with the states, it could save taxpayers billions of dollars. If not, it could easily result in chaos and confusion for Medicaid providers and health plans and a time sink for state Medicaid agencies.

It also creates (1) significant new business opportunities for anti-fraud contractors and systems vendors, (2) new financial incentives for states to beef up their own systems and staff, and (3) new opportunities for whistleblowers and for qui tam suits.

The DRA creates a federal Medicaid Integrity Program, including new contractors, additional federal staff, and financial incentives for states to increase their own efforts at fraud detection and payment recovery. Congress is giving the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) an additional 100 staff plus $50-$75 million a year for outside contractors. If a state enacts its own false claims act, it will be able to retain a larger share of any payment recoveries. (Only 15 states and DC now have some form of state false claims act.) The effect is that compliant states could increase their savings from anti-fraud efforts by as much as 20 percent.

The new law also requires organizations with more than $5 million in annual Medicaid payments to regularly train employees on Medicaid fraud laws and reporting. Across the country, this will apply to thousands of hospitals, nursing homes, home care providers, Medicaid managed care organizations, and counties, as well as many chain pharmacies, clinics, other providers, and the Medicaid fiscal agents like EDS and ACS.