The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) at HHS has released its 93-page work plan for FY 2007. The OIG plans to examine nearly 100 issues in Medicaid, with particular attention on:

1. Medicaid reimbursement of hospitals, nursing homes, managed care organizations, home and community-based care, and mental health providers.

2. Medicaid prescription drug benefit issues, including pharmaceutical industry practices affecting pricing and rebates.

3. Financing practices used by states, most notably provider taxes, certified public expenditures, and upper payment limit issues.

4. Budget neutrality of Medicaid waivers, specifically Section 1115 Medicaid reform waivers and Section 1915 waivers for managed care or home- and community-based care programs.

Role and Influence of OIG in Medicaid:

The federal government has significantly increased staffing at both CMS and the OIG to review or audit state Medicaid agencies, Medicaid providers, drug manufacturers, and Medicaid managed care organizations. This, in turn, has increased the number, diversity, and complexity of Medicaid issues under review by the two federal agencies.

OIG studies and evaluations often help states learn about ways to improve Medicaid program efficiency. They also help CMS target its limited resources. OIG reports also provide valuable insights on best practices and program innovations. And, of course, OIG reports can lead to recommendations that CMS recover federal funds from states or recoup payments from providers.

Part of the OIG’s work plan focuses on checking to ensure that CMS, states, or providers are compliant with newly enacted or even long standing federal requirements. Other projects will look to see whether inappropriate or questionable practices recently found in a few locations are isolated cases or indications of a broader, national problem in Medicaid.

However, several of the OIG’s Medicaid related projects for 2007 will look at controversial Medicaid policy issues such as whether waivers approved by the Secretary of HHS are budget neutral and if some states are using Medicaid to pay for non-emergency care for illegal immigrants.

Medicaid Hospital Payments:

In the hospital arena, the OIG will look at the reasonableness of cost outlier payments for inpatient admissions, state compliance with OBRA ’93 limits on disproportionate share hospital payments, and whether states are correctly determining hospital eligibility for disproportionate share payments.

Medicaid Long-Term Care Services:

The OIG intends to look more closely at home and community-based services. For example, the OIG will examine whether states are inadvertently paying for home and community-based services after a beneficiary’s death or during a hospitalization. They are also looking at whether certain states are improperly claiming federal match on state costs of administering home and community-based waiver programs. As I mentioned earlier, they are also evaluating whether home and community-based waiver programs are budget neutral. That is, whether they are no more costly than nursing home care.

Elsewhere in Medicaid long-term care, the OIG plans to study state determinations of nursing home eligibility and the adequacy of state safeguards against improper asset transfers. They also want to know if states are recovering funds from estates as required by federal law. In addition, they plan to study possible duplicate payments to nursing homes and hospitals. Specifically, they want to get a handle on whether some hospitals are being paid for patients already discharged to a nursing home and if nursing homes are being paid while a beneficiary is a hospital inpatient. Further, the OIG plans to see if some home care providers were improperly paid for care provided to residents of assisted living facilities. The OIG also has projects to examine the appropriateness of Medicaid payments to personal care providers and physical and occupational therapists.

Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services:

Mental health and substance abuse services and providers are also coming under greater scrutiny. For example, the OIG is looking at the appropriateness of Medicaid payments for community mental health centers, outpatient clinics, day treatment programs, inpatient and outpatient alcohol and drug treatment, and community residencies for persons with mental disabilities.

Medicaid Drug Costs:

The OIG work plan for FY 2007 naturally includes a long list of projects looking at Medicaid prescription drug costs. This includes reviews of how drug companies determine average manufacturer price (AMP) and the adequacy of CMS’ oversight of Medicaid drug rebates. Other OIG studies will assess drug price fluctuations and whether states overpay for drugs to treat HIV.

Medicaid Managed Care:

The OIG work plan also calls for several evaluations of issues affecting Medicaid managed care organizations (MMCOs). For example, the OIG wants to know if some states are inappropriately paying Medicaid MCOs for dual eligibles and if states are paying fee-for-service claims for beneficiaries covered under Medicaid health plans. The OIG also intends to examine the completeness and accuracy of encounter data submitted by Medicaid MCOs.

State Administration of Medicaid:

The Office of the Inspector General is also eager to evaluate a wide range of issues regarding day-to-day administration of Medicaid by states. Again, the list of target issues is long. For example, the OIG work plan includes projects to examine state administrative costs, program integrity efforts, information systems, administrative claiming by counties, state overrides of claims system edits and audits, revenue maximization practices, and third party collections.

To Learn More:

Those are just some of the Medicaid related topics the OIG plans to study in FY 2007. Most of the OIG projects will likely result in a public report in 2007. To read the full work plan, click here (PDF).