The federal False Claims Act has been an effective tool in combating fraud and abuse in government programs, particularly Medicare. Several states have their own state versions of false claims legislation. The federal Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), enacted last February, gives states a powerful new financial incentive to enact state false claims acts modeled after the federal version and directed at fighting Medicaid fraud and abuse.

Specifically, states with state false claims acts that meet certain federal standards are able to keep more of whatever is recovered from fraudulent Medicaid providers or suppliers. The incentive amounts to ten percentage points of any recovery. For example, if a state has a 50% federal Medicaid match, it would normally have to return to the feds 50% of anything recovered. However, if the state has a federally compliant false claims act, the state gets to keep 60% or a 10 percentage point jump in its share. For most states, this could easily result in millions of dollars kept in the state.

OIG Review of State False Claims Acts:

Under the DRA, the HHS Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is responsible for looking at state false claims laws (whether new, existing, or amended) to see if they meet the federal standard and therefore if the state gets the incentive. To read the OIG’s review guidelines, click here.

So far, at the request of state officials, the OIG has looked at existing statutes in ten states: California, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Tennessee, and Texas. According to the OIG, the state false claims statutes in Illinois, Massachusetts, and Tennessee meet the DRA requirements and therefore these states’ Medicaid programs may keep more of any Medicaid recoveries. The other states will need to amend their statutes if they wish to qualify for financial incentive.

Background on Federal False Claims Act:

Since the nation’s founding, federal law has permitted private citizens to sue on behalf of the government to combat fraud in public programs. If the fraud or false claim is proven in court, the citizen bringing the suit gets to keep a portion of the funds recovered as an incentive.

Today, fraud fighters and whistleblowers use the federal False Claims Act, which was enacted in 1863 to stop fraud by military suppliers to the Union Army. Revised several times by Congress, the federal False Claims Act (FCA) has been increasingly used to bring lawsuits against health care providers and suppliers.

Of course, federal prosecutors may also bring criminal charges but in criminal cases they must prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. Civil cases are much easier to win in the complex world of health care claims since the standard is a preponderance of the evidence.

How the False Claims Act Works:

How%20FCA%20Works.jpgUnder the False Claims Act, a person with knowledge of fraud against the U.S. government may file a civil suit on behalf of the government against the person or business that allegedly committed the fraud. These are referred to qui tam cases. “Qui tam” (pronounced “key tam” or “kwee tam” and Latin for “who as well”) is used in short for longer Latin phrase meaning “he who (sues) for the king as well as for himself.” (Okay, for Latin buffs, it’s qui tam pro domino rege quam pro seipse. Now you know why everybody just says Qui Tam.)

Qui tam lawsuits are first filed with the federal district court in secret, to give the U.S. Justice Department time to decide whether to intervene and take over prosecuting the case itself. DOJ takes on about a quarter of these cases. If DOJ decides not to take the case, the qui tam plaintiff or “relator” – who is often an internal whistleblower since they need to be the source of information in the case – may pursue the case on behalf of the federal government but at his or her own expense. However, unlike other civil actions where a person can represent themselves (unwise but possible), the relator must hire an attorney to represent them.

The False Claims Act provides for treble damages. Therefore, if fraud is proven through the civil case, the defendant(s) are liable for three times the original cost of the fraud to the taxpayers – plus civil fines of $5,000 to $10,000 for each instance of fraud or false claim.

The amount received by a successful qui tam plaintiff depends on whether the DOJ took the case. If the Justice Department takes the case, the qui tam plaintiff gets between 15% and 25% of the recovery. If the Justice Department declines to take the case and the relator pursues the civil suit on their own, the qui tam plaintiff receives 25% to 30% of the recovery.

Given the size of some of these incentives, the Justice Department often balks and tries to get them reduced, arguing that the plaintiff lacked the direct knowledge required to qualify. Therefore, the payouts to successful whistleblowers often lead to legal battles long after the fraud is proven and defendants pay up.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in just such a case where the federal government was challenging the right of a successful qui tam plaintiff to collect a portion of recoveries. The ruling, expected by this summer, could have a major impact on future qui tam suits.

Please check out my previous posts on Medicaid program integrity issues.